Academic Leadership Courses

The Shelton Leadership Center’s academic courses seek to align with the university’s strategic plan for student success and organizational improvements. The Center’s academic courses strengthen the university’s interdisciplinary scholarship to better address societal challenges and global engagement through focused strategic partnerships.  Explore these courses that will help develop students’ understanding, skills and leadership mindset.

Leading starts with Learning

SLC 250: Critical & Creative Decision-Making Models

This course is open to all undergraduate students. It is designed for students who want to learn to think critically and creatively when making decisions by taking into consideration a variety of decision-making models across disciplines. Throughout the course, students will be presented a variety of decision-making processes, as well as five models on decision-making across disciplines to consider when addressing different problems. Questions will be asked of students in a way that will foster critical and creative thinking in order to analyze, process, and identify effective ways for approaching a problem or situation. Students will be asked to reflect on how the decisions made may or may not apply to their respective majors.

This has been one of my favorite courses in my college career because I have found it applicable to different parts of my everyday life. I will continue to use the processes and decision-making models to help make difficult decisions for years to come.”

 

NOTE: The course is required for the Leadership: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives Minor

Faculty: Dr. Deborah Acker
Office: 919-513-0150
Email: dlreno@ncsu.edu

SLC 300: Leading with an Ethical Perspective

Students will explore personal and professional aspects of ethical leadership perspectives. They can look at ethical perspectives from a general overview or they can choose to focus on ethical perspectives within their specific field, such as business, entrepreneurship, engineering, or athletics. Students will use a variety of ethical frameworks to analyze ethical situations and how values held by leaders and organizations result in ethical impacts and outcomes. The course will address philosophical origins of ethical frameworks and how they relate to the current business and societal environment. Primary focus will be on supporting students in identifying their personal values and developing a values-based plan for their individual leadership style to help them succeed as values-based leaders in their fields.

Faculty: Dr. Anna L. Patton
Office Location: Bowen 100B
Office Phone: 919-515-6274

SLC 401: Independent Study in Leadership Theory Application

Course Description: The purpose of this course is for students to analyze and apply one or more leadership theories through a discipline-specific, independent project. The course includes the study and application of leadership theories, concepts, and skills within the context of a discipline-specific, independent project related to the academic and professional aspirations of the student. The scope of the independent project is broad and recognizes a range of opportunities from faculty-guided research, to independent studies, to community-engagement projects, but must be designed in consultation with the faculty and/or organizational lead and course instructor. Through associated assignments and projects, students will be expected to evaluate their selected leadership theory or theories in comparison with more traditional applications of leadership models. The student may be charged a $20 liability insurance fee through the registrar office if the selected independent study requires any off-campus travel. This will be confirmed with the faculty, site-coordinator, and student during the development of a mutually-beneficial contract for all entities involved in the project. 

 

Course Learning Outcomes: Students successfully completing this course will be able to:

  1. Describe conceptual components of selected leadership theory or theories
  2. Apply a leadership theory, or theories, to address a discipline-specific concern within your area of interest
  3. Design an independent project using academic knowledge of leadership theory
  4. Explain project relevance to academic, professional, and/or one’s leadership goals
  5. Evaluate experience for professional aspirations

Faculty: Dr. Michael Domeracki
Office: 919-513-2790
Email: domeracki@ncsu.edu

SLC 450: Applied Leadership Skill-Building Within an Internship Experience

This course provides an opportunity for students to gain practical leadership skills and knowledge that will be transferable to the student’s academic and career goals. A minimum of 150 hours over the equivalence of a semester period will earn three credit hours for the experience. The student is responsible for arranging the internship experience. The coordinator for Shelton Leadership Courses (SLC) will need to approve the experience prior to the start date. To gain approval, a student must submit the completed SLC 450 contract and have it approved by his/her internship experience supervisor, academic advisor, and the SLC 450 coordinator. In addition to the work described in the contract, a student will complete a series of reflective assignments related to the experience.

There are no set meeting times for SLC 450 beyond the scheduled due dates for assignments. The work schedule is by agreement between the student and his/her experience supervisor. A minimum of 150 hours over the equivalence of a semester period will earn three credit hours. This does not include time spent on the assignments submitted through the Moodle course management system. Due dates for assignments are provided on the course Moodle site and will be set at the beginning of the semester.

Faculty: Dr. Deborah Acker
Office: 919-513-0150
Email: dlreno@ncsu.edu

SLC 101: Community Leadership

The purpose of this course is to encourage students to carefully analyze their responsibilities and commitments in the context of leadership for the common good and for purposeful change. Students will come to understand the concept of relational leadership and how it differs from traditional leadership theories. The course includes the study of leadership as well as the application of leadership theories, concepts, and skills. Students will also develop their own leadership potential through the completion of personal and leadership self-assessments, values exploration, and leadership skills applications through course activities.

NOTE: Freshman students residing within the Leadership Impact Village are required to take this one-credit course Fall Semester.

Faculty: Dr. Anna L. Patton
Office Location: Bowen 100B
Office Phone: 919-515-6274